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Nandakishore

Sacred Space

Joseph Campbell said: "Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again." This is my sacred space, in the midst of a jumble of books of no particular denomination in a cavernous dimly-lit library hall, whiling my time away among the musty pages while the world busy destroying itself outside. You are welcome, fellow reader, to share this space.

Currently reading

Italian Folktales
Italo Calvino
Gilead
Marilynne Robinson
A Fanatic Heart: Selected Stories
Diary of a Wimpy Kid - Rodrick Rules - Jeff Kinney I read this book for two reasons: I needed to get my book count up for the reading challenge, and reading We Need To Talk About Kevin immediately after No Country For Old Men was too much darkness, even for me. I picked this up from son's shelf, because I had enjoyed the first book: my son was flabbergasted, and my wife made fun of me, saying she'd give me Peter Pan next. But I am glad I did pick it up, however.

Greg Heffley is a loser: bullied by his elder brother and followed about by his tattletale younger one, ignored by the pretty girls and able to befriend only the unspeakable Rowley, he must be justified in feeling that life is unjust to him. He pours all this righteous indignation into the "journal" (he will kill himself before he calls it a "diary"!) his mother forces him to write. The result is HILARIOUS.

Jeff Kinney is a truly comic writer who has mastered the strength of the understatement. Greg's voice throughout the book is a sort of sardonic monotone-one is reminded of those sad-faced clowns who will have you in stitches. The journal is pieced together in little vignettes, like a series of connected jokes-and the punchline is often a cartoon. (I feel that authors should use illustrations more often, even in serious novels. In Vanity Fair, Thackeray's illustrations are as famous as his words.)

Greg, in this book, has grown up a little from his previous outing. His sarcasm has taken on an edge, and the portraits he paints of his Dad and Mom are less than flattering. Yet, they are lovable, all the same.

Jeff Kinney has written a book that can be enjoyed by children and adults alike.

Recommended whenever one needs a mood uplift!